When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

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To deny the deniers, champion the cause of science — Christopher Knittel

From WBUR Cognoscenti When a group of students recently met with me about getting MIT to divest from fossil fuels, I suggested a more effective approach: If they really want to mitigate climate change, I suggested, start by calling out politicians and others who continue to deny the scientific consensus about climate change and its causes. And as I thought about the need to hold people accountable for the consequences of their science denial, I realized that institutions such as my own — not just our students — also need to get off the sidelines. We need to do a better job of defending and championing scientific truth. And we cannot wait. The title for a Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works that opened on July 18 gets it right:“Climate Change: It’s Happening Now.” But so, too, is denial, and not just of the manmade causes of climate change. In our classes … Read More »The post To deny the deniers, champion the cause of science — Christopher Knittel appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Ebola: The dark side of globalization — Trond Undheim

From Fortune As upcoming goals, the United Nations should enact basic sanitation, healthcare and governance in failed or collapsing states not simply because of moral concerns, but because of our own safety concerns. You would think we would have learned to deal with globalization by now. Goods, services, people, and money, and occasionally, diseases, flow across borders at a staggering pace. Little can stop these flows. Not walls. Not presidents. Not health authorities. People, however, remain quite rooted in their local communities. So rooted that when a global health scare comes along, we only react when somebody we know, in our country, or somewhere we know well, is affected. Most people’s identity is local, not global, and not even international. Perhaps we should be glad. It gives focus. We attend to what is near. Perhaps, therefore, most of us underestimated Ebola. In Norway, nobody reacted when a nurse on volunteer duty … Read More »The post Ebola: The dark side of globalization — Trond Undheim appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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