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Increasing click-through rates with ad morphing — Glen Urban and John Hauser

From Fortune China Everyone is trying to make their banner ads and new media more effective. In the banner area, 90% of the effort is spent on targeting. If you click on a link, you’ll get a particular ad. A whole industry has emerged focused on collecting click stream data and making recommendations. But that is only half the picture. Equally important is the question of how you should talk to consumers once they are targeted. This is what ad morphing is all about. For example, a car company may target a consumer whose click history indicates he is interested in buying a car. However, instead of just randomly sending him car ads, it can track the consumer’s online behavior to determine his preferred communication style. We also call this his cognitive or thinking style. Does the consumer want a picture of the car at a NASCAR race? Or would … Read More »The post Increasing click-through rates with ad morphing — Glen Urban and John Hauser appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Understanding the implications of consumer empowerment in health care — Renée Richardson Gosline

From Huffington Post The days of the passive patient and omnipotent Marcus Welby-like physician are long gone. Since the 1990s, consumer empowerment in health care has been increasing, most notably with the advent of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription medicines. Then, the rise of digital media allowed consumers to search symptoms and create communities around common disease experiences. More recently, the ability to shop for health insurance through health care exchanges and obtain treatment at drug store clinics has led to a new age of consumer empowerment. We’ve gone from a B-to-B model to a B-to-C model in health care. This shift in power to consumers has many implications when it comes to how we make decisions about our health care. Here are six ways that a behavioral lens can help us understand the implications of empowering consumers in health care: 1. Heuristics Heuristics are very important. These mental shortcuts or “rules of thumb” … Read More »The post Understanding the implications of consumer empowerment in health care — Renée Richardson Gosline appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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